http://a-s-i-m.tnt-online.ru/
TV

The Russian Version of ‘It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia’ Looks Amazing

"Strong friendship, true love, idealism, nobility and dignity, humility and kindness -- all this has nothing to do with the heroes of the series."

Everyone’s favorite oddball comedy “It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia” has spread well beyond Philadelphia, and even past the borders of America itself. Yup, there’s now a Russian version of the show, and though it sounds almost bizarre enough to be part of a plotline, it’s actually true. The spinoff version will essentially be called “It’s Always Sunny in Moscow” and there are clips of it posted on TNT Russia’s YouTube channel.

The name of the bar that they use in the Russian version isn’t called “Paddy’s Pub,” but instead, it’s titled “Philadelphia”—a great way to nod to the original show.

When you type the show’s name in Russian into YouTube, plenty more clips show up. Apparently, the first episode of the Russian version of the show aired on May 12 of this year.

All the characters are here: Max “Thick” Borisenko (Charlie Kelly), Sergei Kovalev (Dennis Reynolds), Alain Kovalev (Dee Reynolds) and Roman Makarov (Mac). Even the waitress, aka “girl with whom love Max” (Honestly, Google translate could use an update), is here!

Oh, and here’s the poster:

http://a-s-i-m.tnt-online.ru/

Here’s the synopsis we get from a translation of the description on the show’s official page:

“Strong friendship, true love, idealism, nobility and dignity, humility and kindness – all this has nothing to do with the heroes of the series ’In Moscow Always Sunny.’ Four young heroes: Sergei Kovalev and Alain, Maxim Borisenko and Roman Makarov. They went to school together. They have their own business — a pub ’Philadelphia.’ But revenue it almost does not work. All their hopes and plans — love and money — are crumbling, when confronted with reality.”

Actually, that sounds about right! Watch the trailer below to get more of a taste of the Russian adaptation. It’ll be interesting to see what the Russian equivalent is to something like, say, naked Frank in a couch.

Embedded from www.youtube.com.