T.I. Makes Diamond Comfortable On Upcoming ‘Sisterhood Of Hip Hop’ Reality Show

'People looking at him and Tiny like the new Cosbys,' Diamond says of Tip, producer of her new Oxygen show, and his wife.

T.I. has mastered music and is quickly becoming just as effective on the television screen, now that the King of the South has signed on to executive produce “Sisterhood of Hip Hop” for Oxygen.

The show, which will premiere later this year, will follow the rise of budding female rappers Nyemiah Supreme, Siya, Bia, Brianna Perry and former Crime Mob member Diamond, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Not only will fans get a glimpse into the personal lives of the show’s stars, they will also get a healthy dose of their professional careers.

“They’re allowing people to get a chance to see who we are on a personal level, but they’re also giving a chance for people to see who we are as competitors and performers and artists,” Diamond told MTV News on Thursday (April 10).

Diamond was once offered a role on VH1’s wildly popular “Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta,” but decided not to appear on the show, which is known for its drama. D feels that “Sisterhood of Hip Hop” is a much better fit for her, and it doesn’t hurt that T.I. is involved either.

“Tip and Tiny have been like a big sister and a big bro to me for years. They’ve always been positive, always been supportive,” she said of the rapper and his wife. “For him to have evolved from some of the things that may have happened in his past to where he is now — people looking at him and Tiny like the new Cosbys, so I value their opinion when it came to this. When they brought the opportunity to me, I was excited.”

The show won’t be all sugar and spice: Diamond hints that the “Sisterhood” may not always see eye-to-eye. “Everyone gets along. At the end of the day if we have differences we can speak on the differences and we’re able to move forward,” she said. “We’re all competitive, we all have the same things in common; we share the same passion, so that’s really dope as well.

“I want people to know there can be a variety of different women, just like there can be a variety of different men,” she continued, remarking on the lack of female representation in hip-hop. “One female can’t necessarily speak for all females. One person may not relate to me but can relate to the other girls or vice versa, so I think we got a dope combination.”

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