Lil Boosie Wrote 1,018 Songs, A Book And A Movie In Prison

The Baton Rouge rapper details his productive prison sentence during a live press conference.

After serving four years in prison for a drug conviction and probation violation, Lil Boosie is finally home. The Baton Rouge rapper was released last week, to his own surprise, and on Monday (March 10) he made his first public appearance during a live stream Q&A in New Orleans.

After some words from Bun B, Jeezy and his lawyers, Boosie sat down with host Angela Yee to explain what it’s been like getting reacquainted with the world. The 31-year-old said the first thing he did upon release was to pick up his seven children in Baton Rouge, and since then he’s been in the studio working on his next album.

Boosie admitted that he’s had to get used to some new applications, like Instagram and Apple’s FaceTime, which weren’t popular when he was first locked up. He also noted that social media has definitely earned him some new fans, and the excitement for his release was palpable, with one fan even comparing his return to Jesus’ resurrection. He still hasn’t tweeted, officially, but he’s gearing up for it.



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During the Q&A he revealed that he’d penned 1,018 songs while behind bars — yes, 1,018, which gives him plenty of material for the new album he’s already begun to record. Boosie explained that he’s currently restructuring his deal with Trill Entertainment and Atlantic Records, both of which have been fully supportive of him.

And, who would he like to work with? “I got a hit for Justin Bieber,” he answered, to laughter.

Despite being on probation, possibly for another four years, he still plans to be back on tour by the end of March. During his time in the pen, he also wrote a book and a movie called “Boosie: The Movie,” which he’d like to produce on his own.

“I feel I’m a better artist. I got more stories to tell,” Boosie explained. “My music always been based off telling stories and now I really got a lot of stories to tell about my life, what my family went through, what my people went through. I’m more versatile. I’m a better artist and I’m a better person because I’m wiser, and stronger and I know who’s hip for me and who ain’t. When you go to jail you know who real and who ain’t.”

The musical landscape of hip-hop has continued to shift over the past few years, but he sees that as a positive thing.

“As for the rap game, I feel like the music I got, the rap game wide open for me to take over,” Boosie said. “I feel like what I been hearing these last three or four days on the radio it’s different from my music, and different brings greatness, so I just feel I stand alone in the music industry to tell you the truth.”

For more details on his upcoming tour and releases, Boosie encouraged fans to check out his site BoosieSpeaks.com

A native of Grenada, a product of Brooklyn, a student of hip-hop.
@neweryork