Jay-Z And Beyonce Got Government Clearance For Cuba Vacation

Source says U.S. Treasury Department signed off on 'cultural trip.'

It turns out Jay-Z and Beyoncé had all their proper papers after all. After three Republican lawmakers asked for an investigation 
 into the couple’s fifth anniversary trip 
 to Cuba, a spokesperson for the U.S. Treasury Department said on Monday that the getaway was all good.

Reuters reported that the cultural trip was fully licensed by Treasury, according to an unnamed source familiar with the pair’s itinerary.

There is a U.S. trade embargo against communist-led Cuba that prevents American citizens from traveling there. Bey and Jay also brought their mothers along for the trip, during which they were spotted eating out with them and later walking through the streets of Havana followed by a large throng of admirers and gawkers. After the pictures of the trip emerged, Republican representatives Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Mario Diaz-Balart wrote a letter to Treasury on Friday asking for more information about what kind of license the couple had obtained to travel to Cuba.

Representatives for the couple have not commented on the controversy.

Both represent south Florida districts with high Cuban populations. They added, “Despite the clear prohibition against tourism in Cuba, numerous press reports described the couple’s trip as tourism, and the Castro regime touted it as such in its propaganda. We represent a community of many who have been deeply and personally harmed by the Castro regime’s atrocities, including former political prisoners and the families of murdered innocents.”

If they had not gotten prior approval, they would have to pay a fine for breaking the embargo. The source told Reuters that the trip included visits with Cuban artists and musicians, as well as nightclubs where live music was performed and a children’s theater group. There were not meetings with Cuban officials, but a tour of the Old City of Havana was led by one of the city’s leading architects, Miguel Coyula.

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