Chris Brown’s Lawyer Slams Community-Service Claims

'Apparently the district attorney's office has completely lost their minds,' Mark Geragos tells the Los Angeles Times.

Chris Brown’s attorney Mark Geragos is ready to fight. After Los Angeles Deputy District Attorney Mary Murray filed a motion Tuesday (February 5) asking the court to reject the community service Brown reportedly completed in Virginia, Geragos fired back, telling the Los Angeles Times that he encouraged the Richmond Police Department to take legal action.

“Apparently the district attorney’s office has completely lost their minds,” Geragos told the Times. “They are making scurrilous, libelous and defamatory statements and apparently have lost their ability to read their own reports.”

The embattled R&B singer is on five years’ probation as part of his plea bargain for his 2009 felony assault of girlfriend Rihanna . Additionally, Brown was ordered by the court to complete 180 days of community labor, which he was allowed to serve in his home state of Virginia.

In a 19-page filing, the DA’s office asked the court to decline Brown’s labor, which, according to Bryan Norwood, the chief of police of Richmond, Virginia, included 22 days above and beyond his required 180 hours, alleging that there were “significant discrepancies indicating at best sloppy documentation and at worst fraudulent reporting.”

Prosecutors further alleged that there were inconsistencies in the hours Brown served as reported by Richmond Police, which raised doubt about the validity of his work at the Tappahannock Children’s Center, where his mother, Joyce Hawkins, once served as director.

“Representations made by the Richmond Police Department regarding supervision, completion, documentation and reporting of the defendant’s labor are inconsistent, unreliable and cannot be attributed to any source,” the filing said.

The representations cited included an instance in March 2012, when he was reportedly picking up trash for eight hours, but a private airline’s records indicate that he was en route to Cancun, Mexico. In December 2011, he was at Washington, D.C.’s Dulles International Airport after returning from a trip to Dubai, while labor records had him picking up trash for eight hours.

These inconsistencies, meticulously detailed in the scathing report, are why the DA’s office made the request that Brown be forced to serve his community labor in Los Angeles under “appropriate” supervision.

Geragos, though, was adamant that Brown spent his court-ordered time “scrubbing floors, painting walls and other forms of community labor,” adding that the DA “should be embarrassed” for suggesting otherwise.

The Richmond Police Department — which previously reported that Brown had, indeed, removed trash, cleaned up public parks, washed city-owned vehicles, painted, stripped and waxed floors and cleaned horse stables while serving his 180 hours — released a statement saying it would be “inappropriate to comment on a matter before the court.”