Trae Tha Truth ‘Left Bleeding’ In Hospital After June 20 Shooting

'It was blood all over the bed, they had to change the sheets, the mattress,' Trae recounts to 'RapFix Live.'

Trae tha Truth definitely wasn’t having his best day when he was shot in the back outside of a Houston, Texas, strip club on June 20, 2012. To literally add insult to injury, the gravelly voiced rapper says he didn’t receive the best of care in the hospital following his ordeal.

“The lady left me bleedin’ like two hours in the bed by myself, like nobody else came in there,” Trae said of a neglectful nurse when the Grand Hustle artist appeared alongside T.I. on “RapFix Live” on Wednesday.

According to Trae, the hospital staff were concerned about the vast number of supporters who came to the hospital to check on the beloved rap figure. “It was blood all over the bed, they had to change the sheets, the mattress,” he recounted.

Initially, Trae didn’t know how serious the shooting was. He was one of five people shot that night, three of whom died from their injuries and one of whom was paralyzed. “I didn’t find none of this out until Homicide came to come and take me away,” he said. “The way I came in the hospital with a hole in my back was the same way I left. I didn’t get no bandage, I ain’t get no stitches, they didn’t take the bullet out, none of that.”

Houston’s “King of the Streets” was brought in for questioning but was never charged with a crime. Another man was eventually arrested and charged with capital murder in connection to the shootings.

Trae prides himself on the grim tales he weaves into his music on albums like Street King and his most recent mixtape Tha Blackprint. Still, he goes a long way in tending to his community through numerous charitable efforts like his annual Trae Day celebration, when he gifts children with back-to-school supplies. Earlier this month he donated coats to the homeless in Texas. Regardless of all the positivity he brings, Trae is often regarded as the bad guy.

“They feel like the type of people that I cater to or that I stand for are the problems,” he said. “The way I feel is that you shouldn’t be able to judge people like that.”

Mentally been many places, but I'm Brooklyn's own. Hip-hop gives me life!
@RobMarkman