Is Macklemore Ready For A Major Label Deal?

'We got to this point doing it ourselves and we want to keep that creative control,' Internet rapper says on 'RapFix Live.'

Mac Miller made history when his indie album Blue Slide Park debuted at #1 last year, but Macklemore and his producer Ryan Lewis are grabbing the baton and sprinting even further ahead with The Heist.

After debuting at #2 with 78,000 copies sold, the Seattle-based duo is taking plenty of calls from major labels, but they’re not looking to sign just yet.

“We’ve talked to a lot of labels and we talked to some legends in the game in terms of labels,” Macklemore said. “I had some great conversations, but right now, we’re doing it ourselves and that’s what makes the most sense for this project.”

“With the next project, we’re open to discussion but we’re not open to a typical 360 deal where they’re gonna take a percentage of your merchandise and a percentage of your touring,” he continued. “That’s the way labels make money nowadays, they take all these other things because they can’t really make money off of CDs.”

Macklemore, who credits his success to remaining true to his own sound, has no plans to stray from the formula that elevated him. “We got it to this point doing it ourselves and we wanna keep that creative control, we wanna be able to move when we wanna move, we don’t wanna get caught up in label politics. So as long as we’re in control of our brand, maybe we can work with labels who can offer us some services. But in terms of signing a deal, not right now, no.”

Although he declined to drop names, Macklemore has fielded offers from the best in the game, and they’re still trying to pinpoint the key to his success. “There’s been a lot of flattering feedback in terms of what we’re doing. I think people are enticed by indie rap and every time you have a group going against the grain, they’re gonna be like, ‘Wow, you did it yourself in 2012, that’s impressive — how did you do it? What’re you doing that’s different? And how can I be a part of it?’

“It comes down to building a fan base for yourself and that takes time,” he said, sharing the formula. “If the people really mess with you, then over time the media has to come to you. And once the media comes to you and sees what you’re doing, then all of a sudden the flood gates open, but the work has already been done. It was something that happened organically. It wasn’t a co-sign outta nowhere, from someone trying to make money off of us, it was us building on a fan base that connected on a person level with our music.”

What do you think of Macklemore making it big? Give us your opinion in the comments!

A native of Grenada, a product of Brooklyn, a student of hip-hop.
@neweryork