Dr. Dre Will Narrate Game’s Entire R.E.D. Album

On 'RapFix Live,' Game explains his favorite track, 'Good, Bad, Ugly.'

Game knows a thing or two about movies. Though he is first regarded for his skills on the mic, the L.A. MC starred in flicks like “Waist Deep” and the straight-to-DVD “Belly 2.” Seems like he hasn’t rid himself of the acting, because on Wednesday’s “RapFix Live,” Game told MTV News’ Sway Calloway that his upcoming The R.E.D. Album has a cinematic feel.

He then went on to reveal another nice nugget about the LP: “The album is real theatrical; it’s a movie,” he said. “And it’s narrated by Dr. Dre — the entire album.”

On the set of his “Pot of Gold” video in July, Game announced that Dre would be rapping on the album, and last week, “Drug Test” featuring Dre and Snoop Dogg leaked onto the Internet. Now fans can expect to hear the producer/rapper’s voice throughout the duration of the LP.

Dre, who originally signed Game to his Aftermath label and oversaw the rapper’s debut, The Documentary, has played a limited role in the rapper’s career since Game’s fallout with 50 Cent, who is also signed to Dre’s Aftermath. Since then, the West Coast production icon hasn’t contributed beats or vocals to any of Game’s subsequent albums. And though the two have since reconciled and have been spotted in the studio together, this will mark the first time that they’ve actually collaborated on album-worthy material.

The Good Doctor’s involvement isn’t the only thing Game is excited about when it comes to The R.E.D. Album. He also broke down for Sway the concept behind his favorite track, “Good, Bad, Ugly.”

“It’s a real quick story about a day in the hood,” Game said. “I’m telling a story to police, but as we do growing up in the hood trying to get ourselves out of trouble, once we’re apprehended, we make up a couple of different stories. At the end, after we done been in there for damn near a whole day being interrogated, the truth comes out.”

On the track, he captures the intricacies of a police interrogation. “From beginning to end, I’m changing the story. Certain parts of the story are still the same in the second verse, but it gets loose,” he explained. “All the way at the end, I tell ‘em the truth, but right when I tell ‘em the truth, it’s like a to-be-continued movie, because it goes right into Rick Ross spittin’ his verse on the next song.”

What are you expecting from Dre’s narration? Share your ideas below!

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