Diddy Thanks Fans, Twitter For Last Train To Paris‘ Top 10 Debut

'Y'all made this project a success,' he tells Dirty Money supporters.

In his latest video blog, [artist id="1244169"]Diddy[/artist] credits the early success of [artist id="3217246"]Diddy-Dirty Money[/artist]‘s long-delayed album Last Train to Paris to his fans and Twitter. The project, which had been expected to sell just 65,000 copies in its first week, nabbed the #7 spot on next week’s Billboard albums chart with 101,000 copies sold.

“Anybody that knows me, it’s rare when I’m extra happy, but today … this last two weeks, I’ve just been blown away by all the support that I’ve gotten from you guys,” the rapper says in the YouTube clip. “You already know I deal with a lot of hate, and I talk about that. But it’s also important to talk about when I’m dealing with a lot of love, and the love that y’all have shown me and the girls on this project … y’all made this project a success, and I want to say thank you.”

While Diddy acknowledged the fact that the group didn’t score any #1 singles with the project (so far), he revealed that the hits are on the way with “Coming Home” and “Ass on the Floor.” The media mogul stressed, however, that he considered Paris to be one of the first albums where Twitter and viral hype trumped radio support.

In addition to the Bad Boy CEO’s video, the trio gushed about defying early estimates in a statement: “Well, they were wrong. With the help of our fans and the tremendous power of Twitter our debut album skyrocketed to #7 on The Billboard 200 chart scanning more than 100k units. Also this week, our new single, ‘Coming Home’ broke through to the top ten on iTunes. This is an amazing start for a brand new group and for a debut album. We are so thankful!”

Earlier this month, MTV News spoke with Diddy about the LP’s many delays. “The wait is over,” Diddy said. “We pushed our album back a bunch of times because we felt, to be honest, we weren’t ready. I think a lot of times artists make that mistake. They get locked into a date and they’re like, ‘Well, I told everybody my date was this.’ ”

Did you pick up a copy of Last Train to Paris? Tell us in the comments below!