Michael Jackson Fans To Have Access To Cemetery On Anniversary Of His Death

Forest Lawn cemetery is providing limited access to grounds, but not to mausoleum where King of Pop is buried.

Fans all over the world are likely preparing for the one-year anniversary Michael Jackson‘s death on June 25, and officials in Los Angeles are planning to help them commemorate the sad occasion. According to the Los Angeles Times, Jackson’s fans are expected to get limited access to the Forest Lawn cemetery in Glendale, California, in two weeks to mark the anniversary.

In plans expected to be finalized this week, Jackson’s admirers will be allowed onto the grounds of the cemetery but not into the Great Mausoleum, where the singer’s body was interred in September.

“We understand that Forest Lawn is working with the Jackson family for some kind of commemoration,” said Glendale Police Sgt. Tom Lorenz. “We will be working closely with Forest Lawn to ensure the safety of those who want to pay their respects to Michael Jackson while ensuring the safety of others who are coming to the cemetery to pay respects to their loved ones.”

Though fans will not be allowed in the Great Mausoleum, discussions are still ongoing about how close they will be allowed to get to the structure, which is also the final resting place of such Hollywood legends as Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Jean Harlow and Red Skelton.

“Basically, they will be viewing it from a distance,” Lorenz said.

Jackson died on June 25 after suffering cardiac arrest at his rented Hollywood mansion. The Los Angeles County coroner’s office ruled that the 50-year-old singer died of “acute propofol intoxication” in combination with the use of sedatives. Authorities have claimed that his personal physician, cardiologist Conrad Murray, administered a lethal dose of the surgical anesthetic to chronic insomniac Jackson in an attempt to help him get to sleep. Murray was charged with involuntary manslaughter in February in connection with Jackson’s death and has pleaded not guilty in the case. The doctor is out on $75,000 bail and faces up to four years in prison if convicted.

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