Kanye West Treats Chicago High Schools To Private Concerts

Lupe Fiasco and Common joined Yeezy in rewarding public school students for their achievements this year.

[artist id="1230523"]Kanye West[/artist] gave the students at three Chicago public schools serious incentive to keep up their grades and make it to school: the promise of a private concert.

On Tuesday, the rapper’s 33rd birthday, he made good on that pledge with the Kanye West Foundation’s third annual Stay in School event, which found him visiting three different hometown high schools to perform mini-concerts along with pals [artist id="2017563"]Lupe Fiasco[/artist] and [artist id="1184"]Common[/artist], according to the Chicago Tribune.

With the exception of a recent club appearance in Manhattan , West has been keeping a low profile for the past eight months. But he stepped back into the spotlight to reward the kids at Farragut Career Academy, John Marshall Metropolitan and Percy L. Julian High School for posting the highest gains in grades, behavior and performance among seven participating schools.

In previous years, the concerts took place in area venues, but this year West and his friends played a six-song set at each school. Fiasco kicked the shows off with his hit “Superstar,” followed by Common’s “Universal Mind Control,” according to the paper.

“We want to congratulate you on the incredible job you’ve done in school,” said Common. “Whatever you do, be the best at it.”

Then it was Kanye’s turn to take the stage. He performed “Run This Town,” “Good Life,” the new song “Power” (which TV cameras were not allowed to record) and “Touch the Sky.” West didn’t say much to the crowd during the Farragut show, leaving most of the stage banter to Common and Fiasco, though that show did end with the more than 1,600 students — all wearing white Kanye West Foundation T-shirts — singing “Happy Birthday” to the rapper.

Would the promise of a Kanye West concert get you to improve your grades? Discuss it in the comments.

Often guilty, never convicted. Serving 15 years to life at MTV News.