50 Cent Finally Celebrates 40 Day In Queens

G-Unit perform a set full of mixtape tracks at free neighborhood event on Saturday.

QUEENS, New York — 50 Cent finally had his day — as in his 40 Day , the block party he had originally planned for last month in his neighborhood of Southside Jamaica. It was postponed after weeks of promotion because the rap megastar was unable to get the proper permits from the city. But on Saturday (September 26), he had all the paperwork in order.

Over 2,500 people came to the yard by P.S. 40, according to security officials for the [artist id="860639"]50 Cent[/artist]/ G-Unit-sponsored event. No heavy prior promotion was made. A few flyers were passed out on Friday, but most of the traffic for the event was due to word of mouth. Even LLoyd Banks said he didn’t know about the function until about 3 a.m. on Saturday, when he received a text message from someone in their organization telling him to show up.

DJ Grandmaster Vic spun records from a stage, playing everything from the “Stanky Leg” to some of his famous blends of vocals from one record with the beat from another. Beyoncé’s singing from “Single Ladies” over the track from M.O.P.’s “Ante Up” went over well.

There was plenty of free potato and macaroni salad, barbecued chicken and hot dogs served with an assortment of drinks. Kids had rides like the Bouncy Bounce, face painting and basketball shooting. Different areas were marked with faux street signs, like Game Pl. and Food Pl.

Doors opened at 10, and at a little after 4 p.m., 50 Cent, Banks and Tony Yayo took the stage. The people weren’t sure if 50 and company were just going to come out and say some words or if they’d perform. The Unit did the latter, at first rocking a flurry of bangers from some of 50′s newer mixtapes, like Sincerely Yours, Southside, War Angel LP and Forever King.

“I line ni–as, I do my homework,” they rapped off of War Angel‘s “I Line, Ni–as.” “I find ni–as/ The ni–as that did that, they my ni–as/ You bring that bullsh–/ ‘Round my ni–as/ Ya die/ Die ni–a, die.”

50 kept the music raw and uncut. He told MTV News months ago that he looked forward to performing mixtape tracks in his neighborhood because the neighborhood inspired his mixtapes.

From there, a wide-grinning 50 went into his “Michael Jackson Freestyle,” rapping over the beat from “I Wanna Be Where You Are.”

“I’m a Southside ni–a to the bone, get that clear,” 50 rapped. “Now I got a better hustle, so I’m getting better bread/ …You think about getting down with me, yeah you better, kid./ Where you gonna get a job?/ You a predicate, felon/ It’s back to crack selling/ Ni– get caught tellin’/ The shell crack your melon.”

“You been to a park jam before. You might have seen a lot of sh–, but you never seen no sh– like this,” 50 told the crowd. He directed them to look at the school rooftop where a slew of cops were posted. He then directed them to look at the rooftop of the adjacent housing projects where more officers were watching.

“Wave at ‘em,” 50 said. “Y’all might as well come down and party.” He also assured the police he didn’t come to start any problems.

“I’m on my best mutha—-in’ behavior. Another day, I’ll be on some bullsh–.”

“Cream 2009″ and “The Mechanic” followed.

“I see a lot of familiar faces I didn’t see in a while,” 50 said from the stage. He then pointed out that it was 4:50 p.m., and he had agreed to end 40 Day at 5. “No more mixtape sh–.”

“OK, Alright” and “I Get Money” came next.

50 recalled old-school park jams, when you could plug in speakers and just party. For this event, he said the city charged him “half a million dollars.”

Another mixtape record came, his freestyle off of “Funny How Time Flies,” then “What Up Gangsta.” 50 went into the audience and touched people. He even carried a young boy in his arms back to the stage with him.

“How much time I got left? They got me on the shot clock,” he said.

Two minutes!

The Unit ended with

Papoose and Cormega also came out to support the event, and unsigned Queens rapper Trav opened up the show.

“50 was really happy we could do this today, finally,” Yayo told MTV News. “It means a lot to perform in your neighborhood. We go all over the world — Africa, Asia, Europe — but to perform in your own neighborhood is extra special.”