Michael Jackson Investigation Leads To Pharmacy Raid In Las Vegas

Applied Pharmacy allegedly sold propofol, medical supplies to Conrad Murray.

On the same day that the Los Angeles Coroner’s Office announced that it had placed the completed autopsy results in the Michael Jackson case on security hold in order to let police finish their investigation into the matter, officials executed a search warrant on a Las Vegas pharmacy in connection with the probe.

According to CNN, police and Drug Enforcement Administration agents raided the Applied Pharmacy in Las Vegas on Tuesday two weeks after search warrants were executed on the home and offices of Dr. Conrad Murray , Jackson’s live-in personal physician at the time of his death. The warrant for the pharmacy raid by seven DEA agents, six Las Vegas police officers and three Los Angeles Police Department investigators was obtained based on evidence seized in previous raids and authorized investigators to seize computerized and written documents related to the Jackson investigation.

CNN quoted an anonymous source familiar with the investigation as saying that the Vegas pharmacy sold the drug propofol (commonly known as Diprivan ) to Murray and that the previous Las Vegas raids showed Murray had obtained medical supplies for Jackson from the pharmacy. Police removed a box of materials and some file folders from the pharmacy on Tuesday.

The doctor reportedly told investigators that he gave Jackson the powerful anesthetic in the 24 hours before the singer died of cardiac arrest at a rented Los Angeles home on June 25. The Associated Press reported that Tuesday’s raid turned up evidence that Murray legally purchased Diprivan — an intravenously delivered anesthetic meant for use in a clinical setting where a patient’s heart rate and breathing can be monitored by qualified personnel — from the pharmacy.

The warrants filed for the earlier searches of Murray’s home and clinic in Las Vegas said that there is probable cause to believe that the raids would uncover evidence of excessive prescribing, prescribing to an addict, prescribing to or treating an addict and manslaughter.

Murray is reportedly the target of a manslaughter investigation into Jackson’s death, though he has not been charged in connection with the investigation. His lawyer has said Murray did not prescribe or administer anything that “should have” caused the 50-year-old singer’s death.

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