C-Murder Found Guilty Of Murder — But Judge Rejects Ruling

Judge declares jury vote invalid, believing a member switched vote in order to end deliberations early.

Former No Limit rapper Corey [artist id="500952"]“C-Murder”[/artist] Miller was found guilty of murder on Tuesday morning (August 11) — the second time the New Orleans native has been convicted for the 2002 slaying of a local teenager. However, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune, in an unusual twist, the case remains open.

The presiding judge in the matter has rejected the guilty ruling by the jury and ordered the group to continue deliberating the case. The collective reportedly decided the rapper, brother of hip-hop mogul Master P, was guilty by a vote of 10-2. The margin signified enough to convict the defendant of second-degree murder.

Miller’s defense team moved for a mistrial, claiming the judge was pressuring the jury.

But Judge Hans Liljeberg denied the motion. The judge then deemed the jury vote invalid, believing a member of the jury switched their vote in order to end deliberations early. According to the report, there had been complaints about a particular jury member who fell asleep during deliberations and asked to be removed from the case, although it is not clear if the judge singled out that particular juror.

The group began their initial deliberations on Monday afternoon and returned to the courtroom 24 hours later to render their verdict.

Miller was on trial for an incident that occurred in 2002 at a nightclub in Harvey, Louisiana. A 16-year-old boy from nearby Avondale, Steve Thomas, was beaten during a melee that took place at Platinum Club. Thomas was then shot in the chest and later died as a result of the wound.

Miller was tried in 2003 for Thomas’ killing and a jury convicted him of second-degree murder, which led to a life sentence. However, Judge Martha Sassone threw out the case the following year after it was discovered prosecutors withheld the criminal background information of three key witnesses against Miller.

During the current trial, the jury heard from over 17 witnesses in the case.

In 2006, Miller, who dropped his rap moniker several years ago and changed it to C Miller, was released from prison and put on house arrest after the Louisiana Supreme Court overturned the second-degree murder conviction in the first trial. In May, Miller pleaded no contest to separate second-degree attempted-murder charges stemming from a 2001 incident in Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s Club Raggs, in which he allegedly pulled a gun on a bouncer. His sentencing in the Club Raggs case is scheduled for August 25.