Eminem’s Relapse Inspires Our Fantasy Slim Shady Playlist

DJ Drama, the Alchemist, DJ Whoo Kid and more offer up their favorite Em tracks to Mixtape Daily.

Mixtape Daily Special Report

[url id="http://www.mtv.com/music/artist/eminem/artist.jhtml"]Eminem[/url] has been a beast since his demo tape. We all know that. He’s told us the good, the bad and the disgusting in his life and never held back any punches. He throws haymakers on the mic, from guest collaborations like “Off the Wall” with Redman and “Renegade” with Jay-Z to the album cut “Marshall Mathers.” He’s one of the best to ever to do it, and he’s made a return to spotlight with his new LP Relapse.

In honor of King Mathers coming back, we’re coming double-fisted. First, we have an exclusive, vintage freestyle that Em recorded right here in the MTV offices about a decade ago. As you’ll see, Em was still rocking the blond ‘do and was a monster, coming off the dome back then. He laid his raps while visiting DJ Stretch Armstrong.

Speaking of DJs, we’ve assembled some of the best in the game right now to give us their tracks for a fantasy Slim Shady mixtape. Before you have a heart attack, we couldn’t include all of Em’s greatest songs in one article, but feel free to tell us which ones we should include in part two. Big-up to Alchemist for getting the gig as Em’s DJ while he’s doing this promo run.

“Just Don’t Give a F—”
“It was the first record that really introduced me to Eminem. It was unlike anything I ever heard. When I first heard that, I was an instant fan. When I heard that song, I was a complete nobody at that time. I fooled the world by pretending that I had an online Internet radio show. I got in touch with Eminem and [his manager] Paul Rosenberg and their camp when they was doing promo shows. Back then, I got them to come to my mom’s basement, because I was such a fan and I couldn’t wait to hear more stuff from this guy. I got them to my mom’s basement, and we hung out. He was definitely drunk. … Definitely, you could tell he was kinda a live wire. He actually came with Royce Da 5’9″.” – Clinton Sparks

“The Way I Am”
“To me, Eminem is the ultimate personable artist. He always brings you in his life. ‘The Way I Am,’ he was already dealing with so much, really coming into his iconic status. For him to deliver that record and deal with what was going on … it’s amazing that a record like that could be a single. Lyrically, he’s one of the greatest of all time. That’s one of my favorite Eminem records. The flow was ill, as it always is. He delivered quality and gave his Eminem angry approach to it. You could feel the hostility in the record.” – DJ Drama

“Love Me” (featuring 50 Cent and Obie Trice)
“That was a hard record right there. I guess it was so much sh– going on, they didn’t concentrate on that record. It was one of those records we should have done the video and pushed it more, but at that time, Eminem didn’t need no pushing. He was already moving millions of units. It’s hard when you’re moving millions of units — 8 million, 10 million units — what’s the purpose of concentrating on promoting separate records? Everybody heard it, it was poppin’, but I felt they should have put a little light on the record. I think that was the first time we heard Em and 50 together.” – DJ Whoo Kid

“Hello”
” ‘Hello,’ it’s Em saying he’s back. You could tell Dre mixed that record because of the sound. I like some of the cuts and scratches on the hook. That’s the classic Em we love. He’s been away for a second. It’s Em. His flows on the new album, me personally, I like how he rapped on ‘Hello,’ the ‘Beautiful’ record is ill. ‘Bagpipes Over Baghdad,’ I like the style he raps on that. For my personal taste, I like the introspective Em.” – DJ Skee

“Underground”
“When I first heard [Relapse], that was the song I said, ‘This is gonna shut mutha—-ers up.’ Straight up. It would not be an issue. Nobody would be like, ‘I didn’t like this, I didn’t like the flow.’ … When we perform that song, Em takes a spot on the stage, and that’s it. He picks a spot and dumbs out. There’s not a lot of moving. When we’re rehearing the song, you know, ‘This is gonna be something crazy.’ He says, ‘Turn the lights down,’ they put the spotlight on Em, and it’s just snap rap. In the current day and age, you don’t hear songs like that. It doesn’t seem like any of that other sh– going on in the world or in the music industry was going on in his mind when he [made the song]. He was strictly into the craft. I don’t think anybody is f—ing with that.” – the Alchemist

“Insane”
“The first thing I thought when I heard it was, ‘Oh, word? Another thing that happened to him that we’re just finding out about?’ I was like, ‘This guy’s life is worse than people think it is.’ It’s great that he’s not afraid to say it or tell the people. There’s a lot of people out there that sh– happens to them that they feel embarrassed or they don’t know how to do it. Nobody can tell a tale of tragedy better than Eminem and make it f—ing interesting and cool to listen to and make fun out of it. He’s not saying it like ‘woe is me.’ He’s saying, ‘This sh– is f—ed up. F— it! This is who I became because of it. F— you.’ ” – Clinton Sparks

“The Real Slim Shady”
“Em doesn’t get much club play [in the U.S.], but when I go overseas and play ‘The Real Slim Shady,’ that’s a classic over there. When people hear it overseas, they be buggin’ the f— out. The beat is hot. It’s a long verse, but when the hook comes on, everybody is screaming. It’s kinda like ‘Jump Around.’ I did it recently in Beirut, Lebanon, and parts of France. Those songs connect to the rich people and young kids.” – DJ Whoo Kid

“We as Americans”
“That was an old record. That’s when he said, ‘I don’t rap for dead presidents/ I’d rather see the president dead/ It’s never been said, but I set precedents.’ Sh–, man! He always figures a way to step beyond what other mutha—-ers are doing with the bars. I always like that beat too.” – the Alchemist

50 Cent’s “Patiently Waiting” (featuring Eminem)
“Classic! 50 and Em over an Eminem beat. 50 in rare form, Eminem in rare form. Both on top of the world at the time. A monster who created another monster. That was just classic. Eminem beats at that time was such gold and had such rich sound. 50 fit the beat perfectly on that. Just the hook alone — ‘I been patiently waiting for a track to explode on’ — summed everything up.” – DJ Drama

“8 Mile Road” and “Lose Yourself”
“That whole ’8 Mile’ soundtrack, even though it wasn’t Em on the whole thing, it was ill. ‘Lose Yourself,’ that was Em’s best. That’s my favorite commercial Eminem single. That was Em in his prime. It was a great new direction for him. What the people in the mainstream knew him was for some of the funny stuff and all the crazy stuff with Kim. But the inspirational side was great motivation music. I’ve used it to motivate me. To show a white boy from the ‘hood in Detroit can come out and do it, it’s inspirational.” – DJ Skee

Notorious B.I.G.’s “Dead Wrong Remix” (featuring Eminem)
“That was hot too. Em held it down very well. Nobody complained about that. You would never hear Tupac or Biggie doing songs with 60 percent of the artists that are booked on those remix albums. But Eminem, it felt like B.I.G. would have done a song with Em. With the remixes with dead rappers, I don’t pay attention to them, but I wanted to see how Em would alter his lyrics to f— with Biggie. He hung with him.” – DJ Whoo Kid

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