Kanye West-Produced Jay-Z Song Confirmed For Bad Boy’s ‘Notorious’ Soundtrack

There is also talk that the Notorious B.I.G.'s son will appear on a 'One More Chance' remake for the disc.

It would have to be Bad Boy. You can’t imagine a [artist id="13432"]Notorious B.I.G.[/artist] project without some sort of association with Diddy’s label.

MTV News confirmed that the soundtrack to the Biggie biopic “Notorious” will, in fact, be released by Big’s former recording home.

Although most of the performers and producers are still being confirmed, an album trump card has already been revealed: Big’s good friend [artist id="1269"]Jay-Z[/artist]. Hov has the first track we’ll hear off the album, “Brooklyn (We Go Hard).” [artist id="1230523"]Kanye West[/artist] produced the song, and [artist id="2990655"]Santogold[/artist] is featured on it.

“Brooklyn, we go hard, we go hard,” Santo’s voice loops throughout the song. “Cross that bridge face the consequence,” she also raps in a verse.

“If a man tests my Stuy, I guarantee he won’t like my reply,” the Jiggaman cautions. “I’m a Brooklyn boy, I may take some getting used to.”

There is also talk that Big’s son, Christopher Wallace Jr., will appear on a remake of the classic “One More Chance.” The capacity of CJ’s participation is still unconfirmed by the label, but a source close to the Wallace family has told us he will be rapping with his dad. The young Wallace actually plays his father for a short while in the Biggie film.

The soundtrack is due in stores January 13. The movie is slated for release January 16 through Fox Searchlight Pictures. MTV News had the opportunity to catch a preview of the movie last week. True to the testaments of Big’s inner circle, such as Lil’ Cease and producer Deric “D-Dot” Angelettie, Jamal “Gravy” Woolard accurately channels the late, great hip-hop icon. Gravy also has Big’s husky voice down cold.

While Biggie’s death was tragic, the filmmakers were able to make a large portion of the movie upbeat as they portrayed the Notorious One’s astronomic rise to the hip-hop elite.