Carcass Reunite To Ensure Place In History; Plus Soilent Green, Vision Of Disorder & More In Metal File

Frontman Jeff Walker doesn't want Carcass to be forgotten by the new generation.

The reunion metalheads never expected would happen is going down this fall, as influential metallers will be returning to North American for the first time in more than 15 years, starting September 5. That’s when they’ll be kicking off a 15-date reunion trek in Worcester, Massachusetts, with and Dying Fetus coming along for what could be a bumpy ride.

For longtime fans of the band, a Carcass reunion has always been something of a pipe dream — one fueled by innumerable rumors that only left them feeling cheated. But according to frontman Jeff Walker, the timing couldn’t have been more right — or urgent — for Carcass’ resurrection.

“If we don’t do this now, Carcass will be erased from the history of rock, to a certain extent,” he reflected. “There’s so much access to information out there, [but] it seems to me that the new generation of kids just really don’t know sh–. They don’t really know who Black Sabbath is, never mind Carcass. There’s definitely a generation of kids out there who are not aware of Carcass, because we haven’t been around for 15 years. A year is a long time in metal these days.”

While the band’s members have been kicking around the idea of reuniting for years, Walker said he was reluctant, at first, to hop onboard. He credits guitarist Michael Amott , who went on to form Arch Enemy following Carcass’ demise in 1995, as the driving force behind the reunion.

“I guess, over the last few years, we’ve kind of drifted into each other’s circles again — myself, [guitarist] Bill [Steer], and Mike. And Mike’s kind of — I don’t want to over-exaggerate this — but, he’s always been the keenest to do this, because since he formed Arch Enemy and has been out on the road again, he’s kind of realized what kind of phenomenon Carcass is,” Walker said. “Mike’s always been kind of hassling me and Bill on the side about doing something, and so I guess the stars aligned at some point, because for years, I said I’d never do it. If [drummer] Ken [Owen, who suffered a brain hemorrhage in 1999] couldn’t play, I thought it would be a bit like Led Zeppelin playing without [John] Bonham. How can you kind of find a way around that?”

But Carcass — like Led Zep — did find a way around it. They enlisted Arch Enemy kitman Daniel Erlandsson, and asked Owen if he had any objections, which he didn’t. Then all of them agreed they’d give Owen a portion of whatever profits they made from a reunion.

“That made it morally justifiable for me,” Walker said. “It seems, to me, nostalgia is the new rock and roll. Not to sound arrogant, but I’m well aware of the importance of this band, even if no one else is. There’s a generation of people who were into Carcass who’ve grown up now, that never saw the band. And now they have some disposable income. They’ve created the demand for this reunion.”

But don’t expect this reunion to extend beyond this year. Walker said that, as it stands, the plan is there is no plan. Carcass aren’t secretly writing a record, and after this tour, Walker’s not sure what will happen.

“Never say never, but I can’t see it happening — I can’t see it working,” he said. “For something like that to happen, everybody’s head has to be on the same continent. It’s different from when you’re a kid. Now, you’ve got three guys in the band who’ve had their own bands and have either been frontmen or the main songwriters, so I think there would be a lot of arguing. Maybe we’d have to get that therapist in that was working with Metallica. With all the money we’ve made this summer, we could pay for a one-hour session with that guy.

“It would be sad, I think,” Walker continued. “These bands that start playing again, some of them get carried away, and they write an album, and they start saying, ‘It’s the best thing we ever done.’ And then it just isn’t. We don’t want to be one of those bands. We don’t want to be doing this next year. I could maybe see us playing again in some of the countries that we’re not touching this year, but let’s see if we kill each other when we’re in North America on a tour bus. We’re getting on great, but we want to keep that chemistry and not get burned out. We don’t want to be doing it just for the money, because it can turn into a chore — that’s what happened the first time. It seemed like work, and it wasn’t fun anymore, so I figured, ‘F— this, I’ll go get a job.’ If you’re doing something just for the money, I think having a job is a bit more honest than playing in a band just for the money.”

In Walker’s opinion, Carcass couldn’t be returning at a more apropos time, because he thinks the current metal scene is bordering on laughable. “I think it’s depressing,” he said. “It’s like everything just merges into one nowadays. Everything’s sounding the same. The problem with the modern metal scene is, people are too busy copying bands wholesale and not actually taking an influence and doing something new with it. I don’t think it’s laziness; I think it just comes down to imagination and intelligence.”

The rest of the week’s metal news:

Last Saturday in Dallas, become the only other vocalist in Ozzfest history — after
himself — to perform two sets with two different bands. At this year’s one-day-only Ozzfest, the frontman first performed a set with , and two hours later, joined onstage for their set. Of course, Ozzy had done it back in 1997, when he performed with his solo band and . But Falgoust said it was no big deal. “Ozzy did it, and even ‘s done it, playing with Black Label and Ozzy,” he said. “Other people have done it, but, as far as vocally, it’s just me and Ozzy. It’s good company to be in; he’s the dude that basically created this niche. I think it would be pretty grueling to do it for a full tour.” Soilent Green will be on the road through August 17 in Orlando, Florida, with and . Then they head out in October with . In the meantime, Goatwhore have been writing new material, with plans to hit the studio in early ’09. The band is eyeing a May 2009 release date for its next LP. …

Rumor alert: In Flames, All That Remains, 36 Crazyfists and Gojira will reportedly team up for a run of North American dates this winter. When this tour is finally confirmed, we’ll be bringing you all the dates, so hold tight. …

Five Finger Death Punch, In This Moment, Bury Your Dead and Another Black Day will be teaming up this October for a lengthy North American tour. It kicks off October 3 in St. Louis and and runs through November 22 in Fresno, California. …

While Velvet Revolver continue their search for a new frontman, bassist Duff McKagan has been busy with his other band, Loaded, who have a five-song EP, titled Wasted Heart, on the way. It drops September 22 through Century Media, with a full-length to follow in early 2009. …

Underoath, the Devil Wears Prada, P.O.S. and Saosin will also be hitting the road this fall, beginning October 15 in Buena Vista, Florida. That tour’s booked through November 11 in Portland, Oregon. …

Job for a Cowboy, Hate Eternal, All Shall Perish, Animosity and Annotations of an Autopsy will be touring together starting November 13 in Pomona, California. That tour wraps December 16 in Tucson, Arizona. …

Vision of Disorder will release their DVD “Dead in NY” on November 11. The offering will feature live footage shot two years ago on Long Island. The band will be playing a reunion gig on August 16 at the Crazy Donkey in Farmingdale, New York. Be there. …

New Jersey’s own God Forbid are hard at work on their forthcoming studio set, which should land in stores early next year. Oddly enough, the disc will feature a cover of English alternative act ‘s “Stockholm Syndrome.” Apparently, guitarist Doc Coyle is a big fan.