Britney Spears' Father To Retain Control Over Her Affairs, Judge Orders

L.A. councilman suggests 'Britney Bubble' safety zone for paparazzi-prone celebs at separate meeting.

A judge extended Britney Spears' father's conservatorship over the singer's estate for five more months after a hearing in Los Angeles on Thursday (July 31).

Jamie Spears, co-conservatorship powers with attorney Andrew Wallet over his daughter since February, will continue to have control over Britney's finances and personal affairs for the rest of the year, Commissioner Reva Goetz decided. "I understand that Ms. Spears is reluctantly agreeing to extend those letters," Goetz told the court. "We are extending them until December 31."

This, however, could change, as Goetz also scheduled an update status hearing for October 25. "The order is without prejudice," Goetz told the court, "and is subject to early termination."

Neither Spears nor her father attended the hearing, in which it was also determined that the singer owed $100,000 to Wallet, and another $75,000 to Ivan Taback, who manages Spears' trust along with her brother Bryan. The retainer for her court-appointed lawyer Sam Ingham was extended until December 31, said Los Angeles Superior Court Director of Public Information Allan Parachini.

Spears was also not present for a Los Angeles City Hall meeting held Thursday in her honor, when Councilman Dennis Zine convened a regional paparazzi task force to address security issues for celebrities. Zine's concerns began when the bill for police to

escort Spears to a hospital in January totaled $25,000.

The Public Safety Committee discussed alternatives to Zine's motion to require a personal safety zone for celebs, known as the "Britney Bubble," and a separate 911-type number for celebs to call when chased by paparazzi, with those extra police services to be funded by the Academy or the Screen Actors Guild. John Mayer, Eric Roberts and Milo Ventimiglia from "Heroes" were among the actors who spoke to the committee in Spears' absence. "Celebrities are our most precious national resource," Mayer quipped, "and must be preserved."