Slipknot Unveil Creepy New Masks Reminiscent Of Dr. Doom, Frankenstein, Leatherface

New onstage looks come just in time for Rockstar Energy Mayhem festival.

After weeks of online buildup, the members of Iowan metal outfit Slipknot revealed their new onstage looks on Tuesday (July 1), just in time for the launch of the inaugural run of the Rockstar Energy Mayhem festival, which they'll be co-headlining with Disturbed beginning July 9 in Seattle.

The images of the new masks are available exclusively at Spinner.com, as a way to promote the band's long-awaited fourth LP, All Hope Is Gone, slated for an August 26 release.

Some of Slipknot's new masks are markedly different from their previous versions, while others have changed only a little. A press release claims that "the latest masks are creepier and more intricate than ever," which they certainly seem to be.

Turntablist Sid Wilson's new look resembles Dr. Victor von Doom from the "Fantastic Four" flick. Drummer Joey Jordison's will perhaps stir up the most controversy: While his mask's face hasn't been altered too much, it now features a black crown of thorns, with black blood trickling down the forehead and Frankenstein-esque stitches.

Bassist Paul Gray's new look might remind one of billionaire Mason Verger, as portrayed by Gary Oldman in 2001's "Hannibal," only more metallic. The masks worn by percussionist Chris Fehn, keyboardist Craig Jones and guitarist Mick Thomson haven't changed much at all. Guitarist Jim Root's mask looks almost porcelain, similar to the mask worn by V in "V for Vendetta," though this one is unsmiling and ultra-creepy. Shawn "Clown" Crahan's mask features intricate leather detailing and some new zippers. It resembles the mask worn by the Gimp in "Pulp Fiction" — think S&M meets the circus.

But none of the masks has changed quite as much as frontman Corey Taylor's. His looks as though it were made of dried, human flesh — like Leatherface, if only he used moisturizer.

Since the band's inception, members have worn masks (along with matching jumpsuits) of their own creation, which they have changed slightly with each record release. It's widely known that the band rarely cleans the masks after performances, despite claims by its members that they sweat, bleed and vomit in them during their live sets.