Justin Timberlake Up For Laughs, Josh Hartnett Tries Music: Sundance File

Timberlake eyes big-screen comedy; Hartnett takes on jazz icon; 'Flash' stands still.

PARK CITY, Utah — We’ve all seen the “Di– in the Box” video by now, and who can resist laughing when Justin Timberlake dresses up like a giant cup of soup? After two hugely successful stints as host of “Saturday Night Live,” Timberlake stepped down from the snowboarding slopes of Park City to tell us that he’s ready to do a full-on comedic movie. “I’d love to,” said the star, whose movie career until now has been filled with dramas such as “Alpha Dog” and the Sundance Film Festival sizzler “Black Snake Moan.” “It’s interesting, because moving into film, [it's always been] drama for me. I’ve been attracted to very, very flawed characters.” Asked if he’d be willing to do something along the lines of a Will Ferrell straight-ahead laugh-fest, the star said he’d love to start bringing funny back. “Like a broad comedy?” he asked. “Maybe I’m a little more precious with it, but yeah I’d love to.” …

Josh Hartnett might be in town to support his buzz-heavy boxing drama “Resurrecting the Champ,” but don’t be surprised if he slips on his iPod between interviews and listens to a few notes from the jazz musician he’ll soon bring back to life. “Chet Baker is important to me because his story is amazing,” Hartnett said, referring to the drug-addled trumpeter who he’ll soon play in a biopic entitled “Deep in a Dream.” “I wasn’t a huge Chet Baker fan; I’m a big jazz fan, but I was always more into Miles Davis, Charles Mingus, John Coltrane and those kinds of guys. Guys like Chet Baker I never paid attention to, but then when I read his story and found out what a messed-up guy he was, I thought, ‘This is an amazing character.’ ” Baker’s natural gifts were hindered by a stint in jail and a violent attack he suffered while buying drugs, culminating with his death by possible suicide in 1988. “We’re going to work our butts off to try and bring it to life,” Hartnett said of his passion project. “Right now, we’re just in the development stage and trying to find the right director.” …

Has the Flash run out of gas? Not too long ago, Ryan Reynolds went on “TRL” and said he’d be playing the fleet-footed sarcastic superhero — but now, the actor confesses that the project is doing something Barry Allen would never do: stand still. “I honestly don’t know,” Reynolds sighed this week, expressing his disappointment while promoting a Sundance flick everyone will indeed be able to see: His mind-bending drama “The Nines.” “['The Flash'] isn’t something that I can imagine happening, but I know it’s something a lot of comic-book fans are excited for. I get asked it all the time, and if you even utter a word about it, it’s all over the Internet. It’s so completely out of my control.” Still, Reynolds does hold out some hope, and insists that if the studio wants the red-suited superhero to follow on the hot trail of Batman and Superman, he’d be happy to work on his wind sprints. “It’s in the hands of the dark overlords of Warner Bros; I think they own the property of the Flash,” he grinned. “If they do make it, I’d love to be a part of it.” …

We all know that “The Office” star John Krasinski spends enough time looking at the camera, so it’s refreshing that he’s decided to step behind it for a change. “John did a really interesting thing with the adaptation,” actor Timothy Hutton said this week of “Brief Interviews With Hideous Men”, a movie written and directed by Krasinski and based on the bestselling book by David Foster Wallace. “It’s his favorite book. Foster Wallace read the script and thought what John did was amazing, and said to John, ‘You solved the puzzle.’ ” The trick, Hutton said, was finding a through-line. “The ongoing story is between a professor and Julianne Nicholson, his teacher’s assistant, and interspersed throughout the movie are these interviews she’s doing,” Hutton said of the flick, in which he stars as the professor alongside Mila Kunis and Lou Taylor Pucci. “She goes through this process, and she starts to question her own life, her own relationships. And then she reports back to me. And at some point, without her really asking, I start to talk to her about my relationship with my wife. It starts off as kind of an examination of how women feel about men, and how men really feel about women. And then it starts to be more about men and their feelings about and fears about their relationships with women, whether it’s their mother, their wife, their sister, or their co-worker.” Hutton is at Sundance promoting his drama “The Last Mimzy”; “Interviews” and “Mimzy” are both due in theaters later this year. …

It’s Parker City, Utah, at the Sundance Film Festival once again, with Parker Posey back in town to promote two films, including “Fay Grim,” a sequel to the 1997 indie hit “Henry Fool.” Posey revealed to MTV that she’s already making plans to return in 2017. “There will be a third one,” Posey said. “[My character, Fay] will be in jail in the movie, and [my son] Ned will come to find me. [It'll take] another 10 years or something.” Don’t book your ticket yet, Parker. Director Hal Hartley thinks the wait won’t be that long. “It would feel really natural that [the third] would start with [Parker's character's] son turning 18, and Liam Aiken will turn 18 in two years,” Hartley reported of the actor who plays Ned in both films. “I’m putting a little pressure on myself because I’d really like him to be 18. I don’t think it’s going to have to gestate as long.” Not everything is “Grim” for Posey fans, however — the actress also has the comedy “Broken English” at Sundance. …

“Save Me!” TV veteran Judith Light repeated here in Park City, a command that doubles as both the title of her Sundance flick about gay-reform camps and the desperation of her next character, a teacher caught in downtown New York on September 11, 2001. “It’s in the context of 9/11, these three beautiful stories about the internal dynamics of what was happening to people on that day,” Light said of “The Shoemaker.” “I play this woman who has been walking back and forth [in NYC], and she breaks the heel of her shoe. She goes in to the shoemaker to have it fixed.” Why any shoemaker would stay open on the morning of 9/11 is hardly the point, said Light. “It looks like it’s about shoes being fixed, but what’s really going on is this deep grief and sorrow,” the “Who’s the Boss?” star commented. “The shoemaker [winds up] fixing her sole — and fixing her soul.”

Check out everything we’ve got on Justin Timberlake, Josh Hartnett and Ryan Reynolds.

Visit Movies on MTV.com for more from Hollywood, including news, reviews, interviews and more.

Want trailers? Visit the Trailer Park for the newest, scariest and funniest coming attractions anywhere.