No Sexy Coeds Here: Ludacris Reunites With Neptunes On ‘Girls Gone Wild’

'I guarantee you it's going to change the game,' rapper says of song from upcoming Release Therapy.

The Neptunes produced one of Ludacris’ early hits, “Southern Hospitality,” and haven’t worked with him since — until now, that is.

The ‘Tunes produced two jams on Luda’s upcoming Release Therapy, including the first single, “Money Maker,” with Pharrell singing on the hook (see “Strip-Club Anthems, Cautionary Tales — Luda’s Upcoming LP Has It All” ).

“What did take us so long to get back? That’s a good-ass question,” Luda, talking recently with MTV News via telephone from his Atlanta home studio, said about his Neptunes hiatus. “I think every time I was recording there was a lot of conflicting schedules and I couldn’t really get in at the time, ’cause I wanted to get in and work with Pharrell. You know, not just have him send me beats.”

The other Neptunes track on the LP is “Girls Gone Wild,” which Luda has some high hopes for.

“I guarantee you it’s going to change the game,” he said of the song. “It’s one of those songs that’s a little bit ahead of its time. I feel like I can put the song out in 2010, and it’ll be right on time. So it may be a little before some people.”

Luda worked with a lot of others on the album, including Beanie Sigel, Pimp C and C-Murder on one record; R. Kelly on another; and he just finished a song with Mary J. Blige (see Therapy Is In Session: Kanye, Pharrell, R. Kelly Hop On Luda’s LP” ).

“It’s called ‘Runaway Love,’ ” he said about the Mary J. cut, which he describes as a 2006 version of Tupac’s “Brenda’s Got a Baby.” “For a lot of young ladies, sometimes you feel like running away because it’s so much stress and so many problems going on, whether it be internally in the family or it be with friends. Or it’s just some people that can’t take the pressure and they feel like running away. My objective is to have you listen to the song and you can kind of run away in your mind for a little while.

“That’s what really the whole album is about,” he continued. “I call it Release Therapy because people go through so much on a daily basis that you should be able to relax and you should be able to release. I feel like when you listen from track one to track 15, this is a good hour where you’re going to be taken away. You know how they say, ‘Calgon, take me away’? Release Therapy is going to take them away.”

Release Therapy is due September 26.

For more on Ludacris, see ““10 Candidates For The Next ‘Greatest MCs Of All Time’ List.”