Ever Dreamed Of Undressing A Pussycat Doll?

Glittery, 12-inch figurines in their image will come with two outfits each.

It’s not like you didn’t see this coming (especially given their name), but now it’s official: The Pussycat Dolls will soon become actual dolls.

Hasbro — the toy giant behind My Little Pony, G.I. Joe and the Transformers — will produce the glittery, 12-inch figurines decked out in short skirts and lace tops, which will hit stores just in time for the holidays at the suggested retail price of $14.99.

“We expect the appeal of these dolls to be broad, because PCD’s fanbase is just that,” Sharon John, Hasbro director of marketing, told MTV News. “We expect people to do a lot of different things with the dolls, from collecting them and keeping them in the packaging to people who want to take them out and have them for their fashion and their looks.”

And while the “take them out” portion of buyers will be happy to learn the figurines come with a second outfit, parents might be less than thrilled with the idea of their young daughter taking home a Pussycat Doll because of the group’s cabaret past, hyper-sexual image and date-baiting singles (see “Pussycat Dolls: The New Spice Girls?” ).

It’s a concern John admits Hasbro has, but she’s quick to point out that doll buying is an activity that requires adult supervision.

“It’s important to note that these dolls are based on PCD the musical group and not anything else,” John said. “PCD are a very popular singing group, and these dolls are based on them and reflect the styles and fashions that are popular in the world today. And at the end of the day, we highly recommend that any parent or guardian should be involved in not only the doll-purchasing decision, but also in playing with the dolls. Ultimately, mom knows best.”

The dolls are the first step in a long-term marketing partnership between Hasbro and PCD’s label, Interscope. If the PCD dolls are a hit, Hasbro can establish a presence in the coveted tween market (girls ages 10-14), a market currently dominated by California-based MGA Entertainment and their line of Bratz dolls.

And though it’s still early, John said PCD will probably record a new song to promote the dolls.

“It’s all part of a plan we have with Interscope. We’ve had a relationship with them for some time, and we speak with them fairly regularly,” John said. “We look at it as being opportunistic. And to get on board with them and crafting a synergistic partnership, it was practically a no-brainer.”

But all this talk of synergy and brand identity is hardly becoming of PCD or their dolls. At the end of the day, John said, “We’re just talking about dolls.”

“Dolls are a large category in the toy industry, and we’re looking to get a piece of that industry,” she said. “And while the history for this type of doll is long and successful — we’ve done ‘NSYNC and New Kids on the Block dolls — we think that fans of all ages are going to be very happy with the end result.”