C-Murder Runs Afoul Of Sheriff With Jailhouse Video

Authorities say they didn't know film crews were shooting footage for clip.

Despite being in jail for the past three years on a second-degree murder charge, rapper C-Murder managed to record a new album, The Truest Sh-- I Ever Said, and, more improbably, a video for the album's first single, "Y'all Heard of Me."

It is the latter that has angered Sheriff Harry Lee of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, according to The Associated Press. Murder (a.k.a. Corey Miller), whose album is slated for release on March 22, appears in the video in his orange prison jumpsuit. Lee said he was unaware the footage was filmed and that he felt as if he'd been tricked into letting film crews in.

"Suffice it to say, I'm not pleased," Lee told the AP. "The only thing I'll say is, he will not make another video while he's in my jail."

Miller's lawyer, Ron Rakosky, said the footage was recorded by a pair of film crews, one from Court TV and the other from a local cable-access program, both of which received approval from the sheriff's office to interview the rapper. "The bottom line is, we didn't do anything wrong," Rakosky said.

Miller was charged with second-degree murder in the killing of 16-year-old Steve Thomas at the Platinum Club in Harvey, Louisiana, on January 12, 2002. He was found guilty in 2003 (see "C-Murder Found Guilty Of Second-Degree Murder, Receives Life Sentence"), but the conviction was overturned last April, and he is currently awaiting a new trial (see "Rapper C-Murder Indicted On Attempted Second-Degree Murder Charges").

In the meantime, he recorded the album and the video, which reportedly intersperses images of him in jail rhyming about how blacks endure racial profiling with footage of B.G. performing in the middle of a big crowd at the New Orleans housing project where Miller and his brothers, No Limit Records honcho Master P and Silkk the Shocker, grew up.

While a victim's advocate told the AP that she thought it was inappropriate that Miller should be making money off album sales while he's a suspect in a murder case, Rakosky said he encouraged the rapper to stay busy while he awaits trial.

"Here's a guy in jail, making constructive use of his time instead of withering away," Rakosky said. "He's lost more than three years of his life, locked up for a crime he did not commit. At least he's not just sitting there, wasting away."

This isn't the first time Miller has run afoul of officials while in jail. In 2002, prosecutors accused Miller of trying to tamper with witnesses in the case by having a cell phone smuggled into the Jefferson Parish Correctional Center in an alleged attempt to elicit friends to dissuade witnesses from testifying against him (see "Prosecutors Accuse C-Murder Of Trying To Harm Witnesses In Murder Trial").