'Aviator,' Jamie Foxx, 'Sideways,' 'Baby' Win Big At Globes

Howard Hughes biopic takes best dramatic picture, best dramatic actor.

Even though "The Aviator" flew away with two of the night's biggest awards, Jamie Foxx provided the emotional highlight of the 62nd annual Golden Globe Awards Sunday night.

"I sat with Ray Charles," he recalled during his acceptance speech for Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy for "Ray," "and I was playing with him and I hit a wrong note, and he said, 'Now why the hell would you do that?' I said, 'I don't know,' and he said, 'The notes are right underneath your fingers. Life is the notes right underneath your fingers. All you have to do is take time out to play the right notes.' "

(Click here to see photos of Foxx and the rest of the night's stars arriving via the red carpet.)

The win elicited the night's first standing ovation as the former "In Living Color" star held the trophy aloft and drank in the applause of his peers. Foxx, who later shed a tear while thanking his late grandmother, led a parade of young stars and wily veterans who took home trophies during the annual telecast from the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles, where the wine-soaked comedy "Sideways," the boxing drama "Million Dollar Baby" and the Howard Hughes biopic "The Aviator" each won multiple awards.

In a rare public appearance at a major awards show, Leonardo DiCaprio was characteristically humble while accepting Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama. "This is incredible," he said, tipping his hat to "The Aviator" director Martin Scorsese, whom he called "one of the greatest contributors to the world of cinema of all time." But Scorsese, who has never won a coveted Best Director Oscar, went home without a Golden Globe for directing as well, losing out to veteran Clint Eastwood, who starred in, wrote the score for and directed "Million Dollar Baby." (That movie's lead actress, Hilary Swank, was also a winner.)

Scorsese was somewhat redeemed, however, when "The Aviator" won Best Motion Picture - Drama. "Sideways" — which had the night's most nominations, with seven — was honored as the Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. It also won for best screenplay.

The night began with a double win for the acclaimed drama "Closer," which netted supporting actor and actress awards for Clive Owen and Natalie Portman, the latter beating out a group that included 20-time nominee Meryl Streep. The legendary actress presented later in the night and gave her young competition a sly ribbing, congratulating Portman while giving an exaggerated eye roll.

A visibly nervous Jason Bateman won a small-screen best actor award for "Arrested Development," first checking to be sure his fly was up and then thanking "future fans" of the critically hailed but ratings-challenged comedy.

Geoffrey Rush, who completely disappeared in his role as the late comic genius Peter Sellers in the HBO movie "The Life and Death of Peter Sellers," took his time accepting his best actor award, laying a kiss on each one of the five "Desperate Housewives" actresses who presented it. (For photos of the "Housewives" and the rest of the night's stars, see: "Golden Globes Fashion: The Dashing, The Dull And The Desperate.") "Sellers" also won for best TV movie.

A short time later, bumbling "Housewives" star Teri Hatcher beat out two of her cast mates for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy. The clearly overcome actress, who jokingly referred to herself as a former "has been," said the award was the first time she'd ever been "nominated for anything [in] my whole life." Plastic surgery series "Nip/Tuck" won for best TV drama, while "Desperate Housewives" took best comedy.

As expected, comedian Robin Williams' acceptance of the Cecil B. DeMille award was full of the stream-of-consciousness rants that have made him famous. "I want to thank you for having Prince, William Shatner, Puffy and Mick Jagger on the same stage," Williams said. "That is a sign of the apocalypse." Williams dedicated the award to his friend, late "Superman" star Christopher Reeve.

Photos: 62nd annual Golden Globe Awards

The Golden Globes are voted on by the members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, and the winners are considered an indication of how February's Oscars will likely play out.

Notable winners at the 62st annual Golden Globes:

  • Best Motion Picture - Drama: "The Aviator"
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama: Hilary Swank - "Million Dollar Baby"
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama: Leonardo DiCaprio - "The Aviator"
  • Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy: "Sideways"

  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy: Annette Bening - "Being Julia"
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy: Jamie Foxx - "Ray"

  • Best Director - Motion Picture: Clint Eastwood - "Million Dollar Baby"
  • Best Screenplay - Motion Picture: Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor - "Sideways"

  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture: Natalie Portman - "Closer"

  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture: Clive Owen - "Closer"

  • Best Television Series - Drama: "Nip/Tuck"

  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Drama: Mariska Hargitay - "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit"
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Drama: Ian McShane - "Deadwood"
  • Best Television Series - Musical or Comedy: "Desperate Housewives"
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy: Teri Hatcher - "Desperate Housewives"
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy: Jason Bateman - "Arrested Development"

A complete list of winners is available at www.hfpa.org.

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