Kid Rock Takes Sheryl Crow Off ‘Makin’ Love,’ But The Two Aren’t Done

Duo plan to record EP or LP together.

Selling more than 14 million copies of his last three albums has allowed Kid Rock to do just about everything his heart’s desired, from meeting idols like Hank Williams Jr. and Johnny Cash to dating Pamela Anderson to buying a bright orange 1969 Dodge Charger, better known to “Dukes of Hazzard” fans as the General Lee.

His latest single, a cover of Bad Company’s 1975 copulation classic, “Feel Like Makin’ Love,” scratches one more thing off his “to do” list.

The idea for the song sprung from a conversation he had with Sheryl Crow, who sang on Rock’s last single, the crossover sensation “Picture,” from 2001’s Cocky. During the sessions that yielded that country-tinged duet as well as “Run Off to L.A.,” from his new, eponymous album, the pair discussed how fun it is to play tunes from the ’70s. When Rock learned that Crow covered “Feel Like Makin’ Love” at a show in New York, the red-blooded American Bad Ass turned green with envy.

“Ahh, I hate you,” he jokingly told his collaborator. “I’ve been wanting to cover that song forever!”

Crow beating him to the punch didn’t prevent Rock from laying down the music, and the two soon recorded the vocals together. Immediately following their previous duet with another wasn’t considered a good idea by either party, so with Crow’s permission her vocals were stripped off the track and Rock’s “Feel Like Makin’ Love” single was born.

The duet version and some songs they recorded during those sessions, along with some new material, may surface on an EP or LP next year. “We’re going to have fun, sit back and just record an EP or a record together,” he said of their future collaboration. “With all the different stuff that we love, with some rockin’ songs on it, some country stuff … Just make some good music.”

The video for “Feel Like Makin’ Love” also helps Rock distance himself from the tender C&W crooner “Picture” (see “Kid Rock Joins The Mile High Club In New Video” ). Far from being ashamed of his teary-eyed self, Rock simply doesn’t like to fit comfortably in any one category. So where “Picture” found him a heavy-hearted singer on the road and “American Bad Ass” presented him as a cocksure braggart, “Feel Like Makin’ Love” finds Rock as an unapologetic decedent butt-rocker who refuses to grow up.

“I wanted to show what rock and roll used to be like, and bring some of that back,” he said. “In the ’70s it seemed everybody was ugly but played and sang great. And now everybody’s cute and pretty and knows how to dance, but has no talent. So I thought we’d have some fun with the Allman Brothers porkchop [sideburns], and some of that ’70s flair, and put it in the video. Maybe shy away from the big-boobied strippers and stuff we always had, and find some nice classy-looking girls and just make a really fun, rockin’ video.”

That image doesn’t stick all the way through Kid Rock, however. Spanning from riff-rock to hip-hop to outlaw country to some good old-fashioned Detroit boogie woogie, the album encompasses the multi-dimensional Rock more than any of his other releases. So rather than go with creative album titles like Cocky, Devil Without a Cause, and Grits Sandwiches for Breakfast — each of which connotes a definite image — a self-titled release was the best way for him to express himself.

“I don’t want to sound too much like an artiste,” he said, “but I really didn’t want anything to get in the middle of the music and the people who listen to it. I didn’t even do a photo shoot for this record; it’s all live shots from the road. I really wanted this album to be about the music, because I feel like I’ve spent so much time trying to get through the red tape and trying to convince record company people and radio programmers and different outlets that I can make this different type of music — that I can dabble in country and play some good blues-based rock and roll or do some hip-hop. [I do] what my heart says that I should be doing, that I feel I’m credible at, then I think people will enjoy it. I felt a sense of freedom on this record after proving myself in all those genres, [and I think I made] a good, eclectic mix of Kid Rock and the Twisted Brown Trucker Band.”

Like he sings on “Intro,” he’s “a funky-, country-, rock-, soul-singing MC.”