Snoop, Porn Stars To Appear In Satire Of 1992's L.A. Riots

'The L.A. Riot Spectacular' stars T.K. Carter, Emilio Estevez, Christopher McDonald.

Snoop Dogg had a rather peculiar audience when he covered N.W.A's "F--- the Police" recently: 50 Los Angeles police officers.

The performance, held in a courtroom, was choreographed and documented by video director Marc Klasfeld for his feature film debut, "The L.A. Riot Spectacular."

If the scene sounds outlandish, that's because it's supposed to. The movie is a satire.

"I guess the point of it all is to show the ridiculousness, ludicrousness and ... silliness [behind] the racial hatred that occurred around the Rodney King beating and subsequent events," Klasfeld, whose credits include 'NSYNC's "Girlfriend," Jay-Z's "Girls, Girls, Girls" and Alien Ant Farm's "Smooth Criminal," said on the set last week.

"The L.A. Riot Spectacular," which Klasfeld also wrote, stars T.K. Carter ("My Favorite Martian") as King, and Emilio Estevez and Christopher McDonald ("Happy Gilmore") as Lawrence Powell and Stacey Coon, two of the officers acquitted in the beating. Porn stars Ron Jeremy and Tabitha Stevens make cameos. Snoop plays the narrator.

"My character pops in and out of the movie throughout different scenes to narrate what's about to happen or what just happened, in a rap fashion," Snoop said in between takes. "It's real deep ... it's cutting edge and something I wanted to be a part of 'cause it didn't take no prisoners."

So far the movie has been independently financed, and Klasfeld has plans to shop it on the film festival circuit next year. Despite taking a risky approach to infamous events, "The L.A. Riot Spectacular" is already garnering studio interest.

"A lot of people are gonna like it, a lot of people are gonna hate it," Snoop said. "It's fly because it's really getting at all the real situations that happened and it ain't cutting no strings."

"I don't think there was anything funny about the riots," Klasfeld added. "I don't think somebody getting beat is funny. I don't think all these people's lives being ruined is funny. But I think what I'm trying to do is not so much spoofing, it is more satirical, where I'm trying to make a point that just these events that occur — whether they be 9-11, the riots, the Kobe thing, sniper or any of these news events — are kind of entertainment. This is our new entertainment. It's not really a joke, though I'm using comedy to make a point."

Several points, actually.

"I definitely think it is saying something about the media glamorizing and turning these events into entertainment," the director said. "I think it's also saying something about race, showing how different we all are."

For Snoop, who lived in Los Angeles in 1992 and said he looted during the riots, doing "The L.A. Riot Spectacular" is a way to acknowledge that police brutality is still a problem.

"I've been beat by the police five or six times before Rodney King, after Rodney King," Snoop said. "The police tend to have a grudge towards young black men. If there's three or four of us in the car, that's just the way they come at us. And if it ain't no celebrity in the car, you really gonna get f---ed with. That's just how it is."

Estevez, who last appeared in 2000's "Rated X" with brother Charlie Sheen, actually tracked Klasfeld down to be in the movie.

"I hadn't read a script like this that struck me in a way where there was such an original voice since [1984's] 'Repo Man,' " he said. "It's so original and so bold and so totally crazy that I just said I want to be in it. I don't care, man ... I'll make coffee on the set."

Klasfeld originally offered Estevez a different part, but he fought for Powell, who "put the biggest hurt" on King.

"The way that Marc set up these characters is you see all sides of it," Estevez said. "You see that Powell and Officer Coon were really just following police procedure. You see what the public never saw, those eight seconds of videotape with Rodney King lunging at them.

"The cool thing about it is that it's just pure satire," he continued. "It doesn't attack anybody, it goes after everyone."


VMAs 2017