Too Short Has Nasty Answer To Khia’s ‘My Neck, My Back’

Rapper says he's just standing up for the playas out there.

Too Short is all for women getting theirs.

But there comes a time in every baller’s life when he has to stand up and say his peace. Which (kind of) explains why Short recently issued an answer song to Khia’s sexy independent-women single, “My Neck, My Back (Lick It).”

The song is called “My D—, My Sack,” and Short swears it’s not about starting a beef with the upstart female MC.

“I was hanging out in Atlanta, where that song has been around for a while,” explained Bay Area legend Short. “Then I went back to the West Coast for a while, where it was blowin’ up, and when I got back to Atlanta the record would come on and it was like some kind of female anthem. [Women] would be running out to the dance floor and high-fivin’ each other. I thought, ‘This ain’t right.’ ”

So, the notoriously nasty West Coast rapper went into the studio to cut some new lyrics over Khia’s music and give her a piece of his … mind.

“The rap industry has always been a female-bashing thing, then you have the Destiny’s Childs and Lil’ Kims standing up for themselves and talking back [to the men], which is cool,” Short said. “I’m glad they have something to high-five about. But it’s not like playas like me who’ve been around for a while aren’t going to have something to say about it. F— that. There’s too many females out there celebrating.”

With her debut single steadily climbing the charts (currently #12 on the Billboard Hot Rap singles chart), 25-year-old Khia reacted like a savvy veteran to Short’s answer track.

“I haven’t heard it, but I’ve heard they’ve been playing it,” she said of “My D—, My Sack,” which was recently sent out as a white label single to DJs.

Short does have a point about the impressive legs on Khia’s song, though. The steamy track bubbled under for almost a year in the Dirty South before her debut, Thug Misses, was given a national release by Artemis Records in April.

“A lot of people are trying to do remixes to that song and I’m like, ‘I don’t know. I don’t need nobody else,’ ” said the former Tampa, Florida, bartender and new millennium Roxanne Shanté. “I’m hot enough by myself. … Unless I specifically write it for you, or we sit down and we vibe on it together … just to come on my s— trying to do an answer to mine or outdo mine ‘cuz you hot about what I said? It’s not even about that.”

Khia understands why some people might be offended, or threatened, by her bluntness (the dirty version of her hit gives Short a run for his money in the rated-X department), but she’s not stressed about it.

“A lot of them hard heads feel like I’m just trying to bash guys, and that’s not really what the song is about,” she said, not naming names. “It’s just about a man and a woman, basically [saying], ‘This is what I want you to do for me. This is what makes me feel good. It’s not like [I'm] saying, ‘Just [do] this, this and that [to me].’ … It’s about pleasing each other when y’all making love.”

Short said his song, which may or may not make his next album, due in the fall, was meant in jest, but he’s gotten the feeling Khia didn’t take too kindly to his joke. “I tried to call her and she wouldn’t come to the phone,” he said, laughing. “I hope she has a nice career … and she’s not a one-hit wonder.”

I'm so fancy.