John Lee Hooker Funeral Services To Be Held In Oakland

Visitation and memorial services open to public.

Blues legend John Lee Hooker will be laid to rest in Oakland, California, this week, with services open to the public on Wednesday and Thursday.

Visitation will be held at Chapel of the Chimes on Wednesday, beginning at 1p.m. The memorial service will take place at Oakland Interstake Center Auditorium on Thursday, also starting at 1 p.m. A private burial will be held following the service or later in the week.

Hooker, whose one-chord boogies influenced countless blues and rock musicians, died in his sleep at age 83 in his Los Altos, California, home on Thursday (see "Legendary Bluesman John Lee Hooker Dead at 83"). Just five days before, he gave his final performance in nearby Santa Rosa.

Hooker estimated he recorded more than 100 albums since cutting his first single, "Boogie Chillen," in 1948. He released his final album, Don't Look Back, in 1997. Among the scores of musicians who have cited Hooker as an influence or have covered his songs are the Rolling Stones, the Animals, Van Morrison, Eric Clapton, Bruce Springsteen, Led Zeppelin, Carlos Santana, Bonnie Raitt and Ben Harper

(see "Thorogood, B.B. King Remember Hooker As Great Friend And Musician").

Reflecting on Hooker's death on Friday, U2 frontman Bono said he wrote "Daddy's Gonna Pay for Your Crashed Car" for Hooker to record, but the session never happened. The song appeared on U2's 1993 album Zooropa.

"It sounds kind of electronic the way it was recorded, but originally it was a blues number," Bono said. "But Daddy never recorded. Daddy never got into the studio for that one. So, I'm very sad. A genius. I think he was told that before he died, so I think that makes it a little less of a tragedy."

"He was one of the two or three most influential blues artists that have ever been," guitarist the Edge said. "They created a whole genre of music. A lot of bands from the '60s and '70s borrowed a lot of his ideas. Anyone who really understands how influential they were, maybe that's the important thing."

Allowing that it may sound "pathetic," Moby said the first time he ever heard Hooker was when he watched the 1980 film "The Blues Brothers," in which Hooker had a cameo as a street musician.

"I didn't know that someone's voice could be that low and that powerful," he said. "It's a scene where they go to the Ray Charles Music Shop, and he does 'Boom Boom' and his voice comes on and, still just thinking about it, it makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. That just had this quality of the things he's seen and done, and me being 12 years old, I couldn't even imagine."

Flowers and letters may be sent to Chapel of the Chimes, located at 4499 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, CA 94611. Donations may be sent to the John Lee Hooker Foundation, c/o Metro Commerce Bank, 1248 Fifth Avenue, San Rafael, CA 94901, Attn: Larry Tidwell. Correspondence may also be sent to John Lee Hooker Family, c/o Bates Meyer Inc., 714 Brookside Lane, Sierra Madre, CA 91024.