Eminem Gives Deposition In Mother’s Lawsuit

Eminem was back in a Michigan court on Wednesday to address charges in the $10 million defamation lawsuit filed by his mother, Debbie Mathers-Briggs, last year.

Eminem, real name Marshall Mathers, was flanked by his criminal and civil attorneys at the three-hour-long deposition in Circuit Court. Em’s mother was not present, but her attorney Fred Gibson told MTV News that Eminem confirmed that he made not-so-nice comments about her in “Rap Pages,” “Rolling Stone,” and “The Source” magazines.

Gibson alleged that the rapper was “coached” to retract one statement, and that Eminem now claims that when he spoke to publications of his mother’s drug use, he meant “prescription” not “illegal” drugs. Gibson also said that Em confirmed making the statement “Every time a relative sues me, I sell more records” at the MTV Video Music Awards.

Gibson said that Eminem retained his composure throughout the hearing.

At press time, the rapper’s record label, Interscope
Records, had not issued any formal comment on the case.

As we previously reported, Em’s mother filed suit against him almost exactly one year ago, claiming that she was slandered during interviews her son did with “Rolling Stone,” “The Source,” and “Rap Pages” magazines and on the nationally syndicated “Howard Stern Show” (see “Eminem Sued By His Mother For $10 Million”).

It’s proving to be a busy week for Eminem, but unfortunately all of his news is coming out on the legal front. On Wednesday, the rapper found himself at the center of a Senate committee hearing on violence and America’s youth. The rapper was singled out by Lynne Cheney, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities (and wife of Republican vice presidential nominee Dick Cheney), who said that Eminem “promotes violence of the most degrading kind against women” in her statements to the Senate committee (see “Eminem
Targeted At Senate Hearing”
). Using the rapper as an example, Cheney called for the entertainment industry to regulate itself and the material it markets to young people.