728x90 DART richIframeInline(S). pagename: bands

 Bands Main
 News Archive: Scott Weiland




Page 1


 The first six years: from grunge knock-off to fop-rocker ...



Page 2


 Weiland borrows more from Axl than just musicians ...







Browse Bands by Name

Or enter a band name below to search:



back  
Yet Weiland's solo career stopped abruptly following more problems with substance abuse and the law, and he reunited with his bandmates for 1999's No. 4, though a five-month stint in jail prevented him from promoting STP's hardest rocking album since their debut. Sprung in early 2000, Weiland really let his freak flag fly: He even cross-dressed at some shows.

Although the photo here shows a more comical take on female fashion, at other gigs, Weiland was going all-out, wearing sequined dresses, finely coiffed wigs and elbow-length evening gloves.

At the same time, Weiland was pushing his leisure-suit dandyism toward the extreme: Brightly colored suits and silk shirts, feather boas, scarves, oversized rock-star sunglasses, and enough Armani to make half of Hollywood jealous. The look was more than a little reminiscent of the couture Perry Farrell was rocking at around the same time.

Neither look lasted too long in concert, since by show's end Weiland was usually wearing next to nothing. Even when not performing, the shirtless or open-shirted Jim Morrison look was evident in the post-modern, Teletubbies-inspired video for "Sour Girl" and the performance clip for "No Way Out," in which the sinewy, half-naked Weiland sports an orange Mohawk for a deranged, Iggy Pop-meets-Travis Bickle look.

Weiland carried his cross-dressing and pimp suits over to the 2001 Shangri-La Dee Da-era, occasionally breaking form with a white-collared priest's habit, a policeman's hat or a skullcap with "NYPD" printed on it, presumably in ironic reference to his run-ins with the law.

The following year, the dresses began to fade from his repertoire and the suits became more conservative, though his penchant for showing skin — sometimes he wore nothing but an American flag — remained.

But although Velvet Revolver-era Weiland is still stripping down with regularity, he's traded in the suits and skirts for a look that's decidedly more bad-ass than pretty boy: a classic leather jacket, studded belt and tight jeans in the grainy, black-and-white promotional shots for the band's debut, Contraband. Gone, too, are any traces of bling on his hands, having been replaced by twisted silver rings and chain bracelets.

And although he's remained free of kilts, spandex shorts and do-rags, Weiland's recent eruptions concerning the press remind us more than a little of a lead singer that Slash, Duff and Matt Sorum used to play with. In a recent two-week span, Weiland posted on Velvet Revolver's Web site angry missives to one journalist who gave the album a negative review for Maxim and another who wrote about the band for the metal mag Revolver under the headline Appetite For Dysfunction and a subhead that referenced Weiland as being "the biggest f----up of them all." Before swearing off all further interviews and accusing the press of being "f---ing kiss-ass pu--y turncoats," Weiland challenged the Revolver writer to a fight. Axl Rose did the same thing in 1991, only his call for the editors of Spin, Hit Parader, Circus and Kerrang! to "Get in the Ring" was composed in song on Use Your Illusion II.

Which brings us full circle, in a way: Scott Weiland hasn't just formed a group with Axl's former bandmates — he's using them as accessories for his latest look.

To be fair, not many of us maintain the same image for 14 years (if we did, there would be lot more flannel shirts, Doc Martens and goatees on the streets). But while it's easy to imagine the ageless Slash five years from now, still shredding on his Les Paul under a thick veil of curly locks, picturing Weiland in 2009 is a far greater challenge.


Check out more of our Feature Interviews

E-Mail this story to a friend

What do you think of this feature? You Tell Us...
back
Photo: John Shearer

160x600 DART richInline(S). pagename: bands





 Velvet Revolver
"Slither"
Contraband
(RCA)



 Stone Temple Pilots
"Sex Type Thing" live
Core
(Atlantic)






© 2007 MTV NETWORKS. © AND TM MTV NETWORKS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TERMS OF USE, USER CONTENT SUBMISSION AGREEMENTCOPYRIGHT POLICY  and  PRIVACY STATEMENT/YOUR CA PRIVACY RIGHTADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES E-COMMERCE ON THIS WEBSITE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY MTVN DIRECT INC.