728x90 DART richIframeInline(S). pagename: bands

 Bands Main
 News Archive: Scott Weiland




Page 1


 The first six years: from grunge knock-off to fop-rocker ...



Page 2


 Weiland borrows more from Axl than just musicians ...







Browse Bands by Name

Or enter a band name below to search:



next  
— by Joe D'Angelo

The lithe, shirtless man in skintight silver lamé pants seems perfectly at home writhing to Slash's blistering solo in the video for Velvet Revolver's "Slither." You'd swear he's been working that shimmy since "Welcome to the Jungle" first blared out of the Whisky A Go-Go in 1985.

But actually, it's just the latest in a series of Zelig-like transformations for Scott Weiland.

Over the last 12 years, the former frontman of Stone Temple Pilots has changed his appearance to suit his surroundings more times than a chameleon crawling over a tie-dyed shirt. His latest incarnation as mouthpiece for Velvet Revolver, a band comprised mostly of ex-members of Guns N' Roses, might seem a stretch for a guy who, a dozen years ago, helped to chase Guns and their big-haired, big-money comrades off of the charts with the anti-glam of grunge. But considering some of the image-leaps Weiland's taken thus far, nothing seems beyond his reach.

In fact, when STP burst onto the scene back in 1992, Weiland's look was about as far removed from Guns N' Roses as it could be. Although STP were born in Southern California, their sound and style were initially pure Seattle: Wearing gas-station-attendant workshirts, Dickies, unkempt tufts of short, bleach-blonde hair and a scruffy goatee, the then-unfamiliar Weiland's appearance mirrored that of many grunge facemen, most notably Eddie Vedder.

Perhaps noticing this, Weiland soon dyed his hair flaming red, but this did little to distinguish him from the Pearl Jam singer. Many people probably assumed that Vedder was experimenting with his own image when they saw the video for STP's "Even Flow" sound-alike, "Plush."

Weiland's assimilation of Emerald City aesthetics didn't end there. After changing his hair color a few times, he let his locks grow and seemed to swear off combs for a while. In November 1993, Stone Temple Pilots taped an episode of MTV "Unplugged," and viewers needed more than their eyes to confirm that it wasn't Alice in Chains singer Layne Staley sitting in that rocking chair.

Weiland rocked his Layne-like appearance throughout the Purple era, but by the end of 1996, on the heels of STP's third album, Tiny Music... Songs From the Vatican Gift Shop, his look had morphed along with the band's music.

As the band matured toward a more psychedelic-rock sound, Weiland slipped into something a little more grown-up, too. In eyeliner, fitted suits and fine shoes, he became the dandiest rocker this side of Prince. STP concerts were usually semiformal occasions for Weiland, and the pin-striped suit he wore in the video for "Lady Picture Show" could have earned him a GQ cover shot.

While no one could accuse him of looking like Layne Staley anymore, one unfortunate parallel between Weiland and the now-deceased Alice in Chains singer was long-term drug addiction. After being arrested in 1995 for heroin and cocaine possession, Weiland was sent to rehab at the end of 1997 and STP went on hiatus. The following year, Weiland released a solo album, 12 Bar Blues. The album showed a strong David Bowie influence, and a pale-faced and spaced-out Weiland even looked a bit like Bowie on the video for the sci-fi referencing "Barbarella." The video borrowed the theme from Bowie's 1976 film "The Man Who Fell to Earth," as if the point needed further driving home.


Next: Weiland really lets his freak flag fly ...
next
Photo: Atlantic Records

160x600 DART richInline(S). pagename: bands





 Velvet Revolver
"Slither"
Contraband
(RCA)



 Stone Temple Pilots
"Sex Type Thing" live
Core
(Atlantic)






© 2007 MTV NETWORKS. © AND TM MTV NETWORKS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TERMS OF USE, USER CONTENT SUBMISSION AGREEMENTCOPYRIGHT POLICY  and  PRIVACY STATEMENT/YOUR CA PRIVACY RIGHTADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES E-COMMERCE ON THIS WEBSITE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY MTVN DIRECT INC.