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MTV NEWS FEATURE

No Doubt

MTV NEWS: How did you get involved with the "Enough Already" Benefit?

GWEN STEFANI: Basically, we've known Sublime since 1989 and played tons of shows with 'em. And then, we lost a very talented and amazing singer/songwriter because of drugs, a total waste. Basically, Troy, his wife, wanted to put together this show to bring awareness to people that we're not going to stand for it, and it is a big loss and a big waste. Of course, we're going to be involved. He was a great friend of ours, so that's basically why we're doing it. Also, they have beautiful son, Jacob, and this insures that he's gonna have college education and these kinds of things. It's amazing now to have the power to have people buy tickets so we can help people out. Ya' know, we did the benefit for C.H.O.P. last night, which is the Children's Hospital of Orange County. It felt really good to be able to give money for that too.

MTV NEWS: A lot of people would think that a band like you guys who haven't had any drug problems why should you get involved? Why should you care?

GWEN: Just because we haven't done it, we've been surrounded by people that do do it. I mean, the whole music business is surrounded by it all the time. It's right in out faces all the time too and it's scary. So of course we want to be involved. It frightens me, really frightens me. I always used to have nightmares about stepping on needles and stuff like that. Heroin's, like, the scary one for me.

TONY KANAL: Some of the money raised tonight also goes towards the Musician's Assistance Program which was founded by Buddy Arnold to help musicians and artists who are having drug problems. It's a no questions asked program. It helps these musicians and artists who are having problems get the financial support and the emotional support to get through and come out on the other side. So, the money's definitely going to two good causes.

MTV NEWS: In a lot of ways, I think 1996 is going to be remembered for all the drug related problems in the music industry. What do you think's in store for 1997? Do you think that programs like MusicCares and the Musician's Assistance Program are going to take off and do something positive?

ADRIAN YOUNG: It's hard to say how much these programs can do. Hopefully, they will educate people, but these drugs are so powerful that some people just can't be stopped. And unfortunately, it's been like that for many years. And I have a hard time picturing it really changing some people who are so compulsive about the things they do. And when you get a compulsive person that starts doing hardcore drugs, some can be stopped and some can't. It doesn't sound that optimistic, but some people can be stopped and some can't.

TOM DUMONT: It's definitely worth our effort to try to be a part of things like this to make whatever difference we can, even if we help just five people than that's definitely worth it for us to be able to help anybody.

TONY KANAL: It's important to reach those kids who haven't taken the step in the wrong direction yet and let them know there are other options out there in life. You don't need drugs to make you feel good. You can have music, music can be the best drug in the world. Once you're playing music or listening to bands you love to listen to, for me, that's my drug. It's better than any else I've ever experienced. So I think there are so many options out there for people who haven't taken that step to know that they have those options.

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