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"Revolution 909" [RealVideo]
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IN THIS FEATURE:

Daft Punk on...
us, influential?
not making the same track twice
"a three-minute track with 40 ideas"
a more emotional dimension
the influence of "Windowlicker"
"let's transmit emotion"
"we don't like the word 'pop'"
the story continues...
Watch Daft Punk...
"One More Time" [RealVideo]
"Fresh" [RealVideo]
"Around The World" [RealVideo]
"Revolution 909" [RealVideo]
"Da Funk" [RealVideo]
Listen to Daft Punk...
"One More Time" [RealAudio]
"Da Funk" [RealAudio]
"Aerodynamic" [RealAudio]
"Digital Love" [RealAudio]
"Something About Us" [RealAudio]
headlines

MTV: Were there any specific events or records that affected the shift in styles between albums?

Bangalter: The only one that I can really see is "Windowlicker" [the 1999 single] by Aphex Twin. We asked ourselves what would be the meaning of the music we were doing: Could electronic music, outside of a club, be the soundtrack of our lives? "Windowlicker" was a real shock for us because it was neither a purely club track at one extreme of the electronic-music spectrum, nor just a very chilled-out downtempo relaxation track at the other end. Right now the two categories in electronic music are this downtempo music and DJ/club music, and we found that there is a middle that could have a very strong emotional dimension and that was instantly accessible to our ears and very experimental at the same time.

MTV: What was it like making Discovery's more downtempo tracks, which are almost ballads?

Bangalter: It's more crystallizing an emotion with the machines. The way Discovery was done was the same way technically as Homework. It was done in the same studio with the same equipment. There was the idea of let's not do something only functional; let's transmit emotion.

MTV: It doesn't seem like the new album is so focused on getting people to dance.

Bangalter: Homework was part of a rebellious side, to make electronic music accepted. At the same time, it was functional, it would be able to make people dance. But it became less and less rebellious, because this music now has been accepted. If you look now, if we were to do Homework again, there would not be a fighting aspect to it because people understand this, so there's only a functional dance-music factor that would remain. Homework was a statement at the time, so Discovery is like pop music — even though we don't like the word "pop" — but having it in a very innovative and experimental way: transmitting a lot of emotion but able to listen to it in a club or anywhere.

MTV: Most of the songs on Discovery are pretty short. Will you be releasing longer club mixes?

Bangalter: There will be alternate mixes on the Web site (www.daftclub.com). We will be releasing some of them, but we want to bring a lot of value to the club itself right now, so we're not thinking about that right away. We might do something.

MTV: The video for "One More Time" ends with an ominous attack on the animated city. Is there more to the story?

Bangalter: The second video is just being finished, for "Aerodynamic." It's the two joined together — you'll see, it's a surprise.




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