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Steve Hofmeyr (born 29 August 1964) is a South African singer, songwriter and actor. He is an activist for Afrikaner rights in South Africa, and has been involved in several controversies throughout his professional career. Personal life: Hofmeyr married actress Natasha Sutherland, whom he had met on the set of Egoli: Place of Gold in 1998, they had two sons, Sebastian, born 13 December 2001 and Benjamin, born later. Hofmeyr also has three other children by other women The couple was divorced after reports of numerous affairs dominated Hofmeyr's time in the spotlight in 2008. In December 2008, Hofmeyr allegedly assaulted Esmaré Weideman, editor of Huisgenoot, a popular Afrikaans magazine, by pouring a cup of cold tea over her at the Miss South Africa finals. He was said to have blamed her and two other journalists for his divorce from Sutherland. Miss Weideman subsequently dropped her accusations. On 19 December 2013, Hofmeyr was arrested in Bronkhorstspruit for driving at 169 km/h in an 80 km/h zone and was released on Bail of R500. He was subsequently fined R10,000 in the Bronkhorstspruit Magistrate's Court on 23 January 2014. Hofmeyr married Janine van der Vyver on 26 January 2014. In 2008, Janine van der Vyver, a fitness instructor, revealed they had been seeing each other for 10 years. Hofmeyr's grandfather was Steve Hofmeyr Sr., a leader in the Ossewabrandwag. Controversies: In January 2007, there were reports that one branch of the News Cafe restaurant chain would not play Hofmeyr's song Pampoen ("Pumpkin"). The managing director of the company that owns the franchise denies that this is company policy and points out that many Afrikaans acts, such as Karen Zoid and Arno Carstens have performed at News Cafe. On 12 May 2011, Hofmeyr released the lyrics to his new song called "Ons sal dit oorleef", which means "We will survive this". The song is controversial, because Hofmeyr has threatened to include the word "kaffir" (a very derogatory name for the black population of South Africa) in the lyrics of the song. Hofmeyr removed the offensive word in his song, citing that the word would offend his black friends and colleagues. In 2011, he made public that he supports the organisation "Expedition for Afrikaner Self-Determination" (Onafhanklike Afrikaner Selfbeskikkingsekspedisie, OASE). OASE describes itself as an advocacy group for Afrikaner self-determination in compliance with the international law and the guidelines of the international community. He is an avid pro-Afrikaner but mentioned that he maintains a moderate political stance in an OASE public relations video. Hofmeyr was heavily criticised after performing the former South African national anthem, Die Stem, at a cultural festival known as Innibos in Nelspruit in July 2014. He went on to perform the anthem on international tours, and encouraged South Africans to continue singing it, stating that it did not contain any form of hate speech. In October 2014, Hofmeyr wrote and published a tweet stating that he believed that black South Africans were the "architects of apartheid" on his public Twitter account. This prompted a significant public backlash. One of Hofmeyr's critics was puppeteer Conrad Koch and his puppet Chester Missing, who launched a campaign calling on companies to stop sponsoring Hofmeyr. On 27 November 2014, Hofmeyr failed to acquire a final protection order against Koch and his puppet in the Randburg Magistrate's Court. Hofmeyr has given statements indicative of an apartheid denialist which has led various journalists and public figures to label him a "disgrace to South Africa".

Source: Wikipedia

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