Rock


Not playing into her androgynous-sounding performing name, A Girl Called Eddy matches the grace of Karen Carpenter and the brutal honesty of Aimee Mann and Beth Orton. She emerged in the thicket of pop radio queens (Jessica Simpson, Avril Lavigne) during summer 2004 and introduced a sophisticated reflection of songs on her self-titled debut. A Girl Called Eddy never really had a plan to do it this way, however. Having already gone through a divorce and worked various mediocre jobs, A Girl Called Eddy wasn't satisfied living the American life. Music had been a magical part of her life. A healthy dose of Frank Sinatra and Tommy Dorsey from her parents provided A Girl Called Eddy, born Erin Moran, an escape from growing up on the Jersey shore. Once her mother had passed away in the late '90s, A Girl Called Eddy's adulthood came to a halt. Music was her therapy and again a positive outlet for her to be herself comfortably. She soon began singing backing vocals and playing keyboards for singer/songwriter Francis Dunnery and got the chance to tour Great Britain. It was right around this time that A Girl Called Eddy acquired her gender-bending nickname. In 2001, she issued her debut EP, Tears All Over Town on Le Grand Magistery. Several independent labels soon wooed her with record deals, but once more A Girl Called Eddy found herself in England. A chance meeting with Richard Hawley (Pulp, Longpigs) led her to set up shop in his Sheffield abode for what would become her proper first album. A Girl Called Eddy appeared on Anti in August 2004. ~ MacKenzie Wilson, Rovi